“Goodbye Summer” salad

When I think salad I don’t necessarily think “entree”. That’s not true thought, is it. Many restaurants serve salads as entrees and done right, salads can be filling and satisfying. For me, the most important part of a salad is the PROTEIN. I am biased, because I cannot go one day (or one dinner) without protein, be it chicken, beef or fish. It’s a must for me, as simple as that. My whole family is like that. We are meat eaters. So when I found this recipe I was delighted.

Don’t get me wrong, I love eating salads for lunch. But I always put either chicken breast, tuna or eggs in it. It’s just not satisfying to me without it.

This is really a very simple recipe. Minimal cooking (if you go the rotisserie chicken route that I do everytime), just some chopping and mixing.

Chicken Salad

1 rotisserie chicken

1 large cucumber

1 green or red bell pepper

1 can of corn

1/2 cup mayo

1/2 cup greek yogurt

3 green onions (scallions)

Dill (handful)

salt, pepper

Chop everything and toss in greek yogurt and mayo.


Mix. Cover and refrigerate. That’s it. No fuss, no cooking. Easy and delicious.


Yogurt Marinated Chicken Thighs

I have an enormous appreciation for Mediterranean kitchen. Maybe because Azeri food is very similar to Mediterranean cuisine. Maybe because in my heart of hearts I want to travel so badly and I would start with that part of the worldūüôā maybe one day soon I willūüėČ who knows.

Anywho…this recipe is super easy and super delicious. The beauty of it is that you can modify however you like. You can add various spices to the marinade, use the whole chicken, just breasts, just thighs or a combination. You can roast it or bake it. Your preference, really.

Yogurt Chicken Thighs

Yogurt Marinated Chicken 

6 chicken thighs (or a whole chicken cut up, adjust to your need/preference)

1/2 cup Greek yogurt (again, I use Fage only)

1/2 cup Plain yogurt (any will do, but I prefer the organic kind)

2 tsp salt

2 tsp pepper

1 tbsp Turmeric

Olive oil for drizzling over the chicken

** i also used 1 tbsp of a Tuscan¬†Seasoning (it’s ¬†a mix of dry garlic, onions, bell peppers, oregano, rosemary, lemon peel, sea salt)**

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Preheat the oven¬†to 375, In a large pan combine everything except chicken. Stir well. Dip every piece of chicken in the yogurt mixture. Use your hands to make sure the yogurt mixture¬†gets all over the pieces. Don’t be afraid to use too much, you want the chicken to be moist.

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Place the chicken into a pan (if you want to bake it, this will make the dish more wet), or on a roasting pan (which is what I did). Once the oven has preheated place the roasting pan into the oven (on a middle rack) and cook for about 30-45 minutes (depending on which part of chicken you are cooking).

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Serve it with potatoes or rice. I made some plain white rice in a rice cooker. I also made a neat little salad that I tried at my favorite Italian restaurant in Manhattan – Da Marino. It so simply delicious that I curse myself for not making it every day:

Take about 3 medium size tomatoes and 1 cucumber. Chop them up into a medium size pieces (closer to small than medium) and place them in a deep place. Pour a little bit of olive oil over the vegetables. Now chop up 2 cloves of garlic and add those to the plate (I would suggest smashing the garlic for more flavor). Now add salt and set aside for about 30 minutes. The juices will run and IT WILL BE DELICIOUS!

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Yum yum!

Greek Yogurt Muffins

They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day…That is the mantra I try to live by, especially during school and work times. So sometimes I get it into my head that I must prepare things for breakfast so my husband and I would have no choice but to eat it. And I’ve tried many recipes some of which have been a major fail. For example, I’ve tried making those egg “McMuffins”…yeah…did not turn out so great. I’ve also tried making various muffins a few times. Some have been better than others. Until yesterday…I finally found a recipe for the most moist and healthy muffin.¬†I actually had to combine two recipes and tweak them…one was too healthy for me and ended up not being moist enough. The second one called for butter, which I thought defeated the purpose of a “healthy” breakfast. So without further ado, here it is.

Greek Yogurt Muffins

2 cups flour

1 tsp baking soda

2 tsp baking powder

3/4 cup sugar

1 cup greek yogurt (I love Fage)

2/3 cup milk

1 egg

a splash of orange juice

1 cup cranberries


Preheat the oven to 350. (I really don’t know why people even say this. Of course you need the oven onūüėÄ )

Combine all the dry ingredients together and mix. Add in the egg, yogurt and milk and whisk until combined. If you feel that the batter is too thick, add in more milk, if you feel it’s too runny add in more flour. Pour in the orange juice and fold in the cranberries. I use the jumbo muffin pan because it’s easier to just make a one serving muffin for me. I also use an ice cream scooper to scoop in the batter into the pan. Don’t fill the batter up to the brim, because the muffins WILL RISE. Bake for about 25-30 mins or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Keep in mind that these muffins will be moist and the greek yogurt will make them more runny than the regular muffins, and the toothpick will not come out completely dry. Just use your judgment.

Note: the cranberries I used were tart. They made the muffins very tart. Which is ok by me, gives me an excuse to spread jam or Nutella on them. But if you’d like them sweet, I would suggest tossing the cranberries in with 1 tbs of sugar and setting aside for 30 mins or so. If you choose this route, I would reduce the sugar that will go into the batter.

Ready. Set. Eat.

Buglama – a classic

Ok, so it would seem that Azeri people love their stews. I never though of it that way, but it would seem that we do! Buglama is another version of a “stew”. It is more formal (if food can be formal) and is usually served at weddings or other gatherings. To tell you the truth, I do not remember one occasion where my grandma made buglama at home.

Another beauty of Azeri kitchen is that dishes can be versatile. Buglama for example can be made with fish, chicken, lamb or beef (or I suppose tofu if you are a vegetarian). I have made this dish twice now, first time using swordfish. Was not a success. According to my husband it was too bland. Since traditionally it is made with lamb (like so many Azeri dishes), I opted for beef (because my husband does not like lamb all that much). All the while I worried about the flavor. See, the dish is just meat and vegetables and if no flavor is infused into it, it will taste…well like meat and vegetables. So I decided to remedy that by frying up the meat first. I chose some oxtail and ribs (the thick kind). After frying up the meat, I fried some onions. Then I layered the dish with vegetables and left it to stew for about an hour. I was not disappointed with the result this time.


1 – 2 LB oxtail and beef ribs (or you can use lamb ribs)

2 tsp salt (or to taste)

2 tsp coriander

2 tsp pepper

2 cloves of garlic, diced

1 large onion, coarsely chopped

3 tbs butter or olive oil

2 green peppers, julienned

1 large tomato sliced

1/2 cup water


Melt the butter in the dutch oven (or any deep pan). Wait for butter to really heat up, then add the meat and quickly fry on all sides. Remove the meat to a plate. Chop up the onion and add to the pan, fry for a few minutes or until the onion softens and becomes clear. Add salt and pepper. Place the meat back into the pan, mix up with the onions. Add salt, pepper, diced garlic and coriander. Layer the rest of the vegetables on top (pepper and tomato). Add half a cup of water and let it boil/stew for about an hour or until the meat is softened up. Serve with white rice and garnish with dill!


Adjab Sandal – Azeri beef stew

There is nothing more comforting than Meat and Potatoes, especially on a rainy, gloomy somewhat depressing (for other reasons) night. I must have made dozens of dishes whose main actors include the aforementioned. One thing always hold true: they never fail in taste. Be it the slow cooker beef stew, or the main character of this post (very similar to beef stew), they always taste great. They do evolve, but always remain true to their intended purpose: to satisfy and soothe the soul.

Adjab Sandal is the Azeri version of Beef Stew, with a few twists. One, there are tomatoes and eggplant present. Two, cinnamon. Yes. Cinnamon. It’s an ingredient present in main dishes, especially meat dishes quite often (among other spices). It gives the meat flavor unlike any other. It adds a certain kick to the dish. I love this dish. It’s relatively easy to make too.

Adjab Sandal

Adjab Sandal 

1 LB beef stew, or beef chuck cut up into small pieces

2 tsp salt (or to taste)

1 tsp coriander

1 tsp pepper

1.5 tsp cinnamon

1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce

1 clove of garlic, diced

1 large onion, sliced into half rings

1/2 cup olive oil

3 large russet potatoes, sliced into circles

1 medium eggplant, or 1/2 a large eggplant

1 large tomato, sliced

1 cup water

Dill, chopped for garnish.


Combine the first 6 ingredients in a medium size bowl. Set aside for about 20 minutes. Heat up olive oil in a dutch oven pan (what is the proper name for them?). When oil is substantially hot, add the meat and fry up for a few minutes.

Marinated Meat

Marinated Meat

NOTE: this is where I always mess up, not sure why. My meat never starts frying right away. It releases juices, boils a little and then when the juices evaporate, starts frying. It may be because I crowd my meat, or because I don’t dry it enough so it retains water. Either way, I am yet to discover a way where I can fry it right away.

Once the meat is fried up add the garlic and onion and sauté until the onions soften.

Once done, add about 1 cup of water and let the mixture simmer for about 40 minutes on low heat, with the lid closed.

Then, add the sliced eggplants, potatoes and tomatoes (in that order) and simmer on low heat for about 30 minutes. Don’t worry if this dish is ‘wetter’ than you’d like. It’s supposed to have water, so you can dip your bread in it!

When done, add chopped dill for garnish and additional flavor.



Quick Cooking Tips: Chicken and Grains

As I was making dinner last night, and it was not going the way I wanted it to, I drew a few conclusions for myself that I decided to share with you:
1) Always trust your gut (and the recipe timing) when cooking chicken. If the recipe says 45-60 minutes, I would lean toward¬†the 60 minute mark to make sure the chicken cooks all the way. There is nothing more unappetizing than a bloody chicken..yuck. Besides, almost alway by looking at the chicken you can tell if it is ready or not. However there have been a few times where I was being inpatient and have taken the chicken out of the oven earlier than needed, simply because it “looked” cooked. A chicken needs at least one hour to cook (depending on the size, of course). But this is true for whether you are cooking a whole chicken, or parts. Also remember that the breast cooks faster than the rest of the chicken, so when testing the done-ness (not a word, I am sure) of the chicken with a thermometer, test the thighs preferably.
2) When cooking grains (rice, couscous, barley etc), always start with less water than more. For example, I boiled way too much water for the couscous so it ended up being a couscous soup, so to speak. Start with less water, and then you can add more if need be. Usually, for rice it’s a 2:1 ratio (2 cups of water 1 cup of rice). Still learning to navigate this though, so stay tuned!

Turkish Baklava

I made something deliciously evil last night. Evil Рbecause of its high sugar content. Delicious Рbecause of its high sugar content. Please disregard my uneven cutting technique. This, my friends, is Baklava. The Turkish/Greek kind I suppose. Azeri Baklava (Paxlava) is way harder to make, and requires hours of dough rolling. This Turkish treasure is easier to make, hence takes a fraction of the time and tastes just as good. The recipe can be found here: http://ozlemsturkishtable.com/2010/06/baklava-with-pistachios-and-walnuts-fistikli-ve-cevizli-baklava/#comment-52321



Chilled Yogurt Soup: Dogramach or Ovdukh

I have a love/hate relationship with herbs. I dislike them in soups and stews. I love them fresh. I know they add tons of flavor to food and are a staple in Azeri kitchen, but I shy away from them. The dislike for cooked herbs started when I was a child, and continued into adulthood for me. I have however started warming up to it slowly…I actually like sebzi gourma (it’s a type of plov where meat is cooked with tons of herbs) and dovga (a cooked yogurt and herb soup).

This brings me to yesterday: the weather in my part of the state has been horrendous. It’s been extremely humid, rainy and wet. My hair does not appreciate this weather. Nor does my body. Needless to say, I did not feel like standing in front of the stove and cooking yesterday, so I opted out for something quick and cold. I remembered I had a tub of yogurt I bought from the Russian store ¬†that was soon to be expired. I thought of making dovga, but that again would require me to actually stand and mix for good 20 minutes on the hot stove. Then I remembered: DOGRAMACH! It’s pretty much the same thing as Dovga, with a few exceptions, one major one being that it requires NO COOKING, just some chopping.

This dish is very refreshing, it has aromatic herbs, chilled yogurt and cucumbers. You can’t get any more summery than this dish. It’s a Gazpacho¬†of Azerbaijan cuisineūüėÄ The only negative about this dish is that herbs are harder to chop, especially when wet. Well, for me anyhow. I struggled with it yesterday, herbs sticking and spreading everywhere, but eventually managed to get them where they needed to go! Oh and an extra added bonus, my kitchen smelled divine!

NOTE: Buy your yogurt at a Russian/Turkish or Persian stores. We buy ours from both, and I am not sure where it is made, but it comes from a Turkish company in NJ. Your best bet for better tasting yogurt is to buy them from an ethnic store. 








Dill goes in

Dill goes in

Chilled Yogurt Soup: Dogramach or Ovdukh

4 cups plain yogurt

2 cups water

2 cucumbers, medium sized

1 bunch dill

1 bunch scallions

a handful of basil (to taste)

a handful of mint (to taste)



dried cumin

2 garlic cloves


Pour yogurt and water into a pan, mix well until combined. If you want your soup thicker= add less water, thinned out = add more. Wash all the herbs and set aside. Start chopping. It really does not matter in what order you go, it all goes into the same pan anyways, but it’s easier to get the cucumber out of the way.Peel and chop up cucumbers, add to the yogurt mixture. Chop up the scallions. Next chop up mint and basil. Last but not least chop up the dill. Crush two garlic cloves and add them to the soup. Add salt, pepper, cumin (to taste), mix well. Set in the refrigerator if not eating right away. The soup will be chilled because the yogurt will be cold. Serve with bread, rye bread is your best bet!



NOTE: You can also add radish, or any other herbs you like. Traditionally boiled eggs go into this as well, if you prefer, you can hard boil, chill, chop and add them to the soup. This can also be made with ground or cubed beef. I would suggest cooking the meat first (sauteing or frying) and then adding it to the soup.